Friday, December 19, 2014

21 Times Nancy Drew Summed Up Being On Santa's Naughty List

Who you calling a ho ho ho?


When you skip buying presents for your family because you had to get those Dolce and Gabbana sunglasses.


When you skip buying presents for your family because you had to get those Dolce and Gabbana sunglasses.


Simon & Schuster


When you're deleting texts so he can't see what you said about his small penis.


When you're deleting texts so he can't see what you said about his small penis.


Simon & Schuster


When you are feeling your look, but that outfit is going back to the store after you wear it.


When you are feeling your look, but that outfit is going back to the store after you wear it.


Simon & Schuster


When you put on Petey Pablo's "Freek-a-Leek" and let him hit in from the back.


When you put on Petey Pablo's "Freek-a-Leek" and let him hit in from the back.


Simon & Schuster




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Which Harry Potter Spell Are You?

Let’s get Riddikulus.



Jarry Lee / BuzzFeed / Warner Bros.


Mia has pretty excellent taste if you ask me.


In case you can't read her handwriting, her list reads: "Katniss taught me to survive..."


In case you can't read her handwriting, her list reads: "Katniss taught me to survive..."


The Hunger Games


Lionsgate


"Hermione taught me to reason..."


"Hermione taught me to reason..."


Harry Potter


Warner Bros. Pictures


"Tris taught me to be brave..."


"Tris taught me to be brave..."


Divergent


Lionsgate




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7 Thoughts Robbie Rogers Has On LGBT Issues In Sports

The MLS star visited BuzzFeed and spoke about coming out, fellow LGBT athletes, and what leagues need to do differently.


Rogers on what leagues need to do differently: “Work your ass off to try and create an environment where people feel comfortable enough to [come out].”


Rogers on what leagues need to do differently: “Work your ass off to try and create an environment where people feel comfortable enough to [come out].”


Macey J. Foronda / BuzzFeed


“I think in general all [leagues]… need to do a better job of creating some kind of a panel where they can discuss issues of homophobia, racism, sexism, all that stuff," he said.


“I think in general all [leagues]… need to do a better job of creating some kind of a panel where they can discuss issues of homophobia, racism, sexism, all that stuff," he said.


Getty Images Kevork Djansezian


But regardless of what type of environment leagues create, Rogers said "it's going to take athletes to come out."


But regardless of what type of environment leagues create, Rogers said "it's going to take athletes to come out."


“The only thing that’s really going to change things is when we’re active and in the sports community, in locker rooms, when there’s a number of us and it just doesn’t become an issue. When we’re a voice," he said.


Getty Images Jeff Gross


Rogers on fellow athletes coming out: “I’m guessing in five years we won’t be talking about it. I think it’s going to take a few more years for everyone to be comfortable."


Rogers on fellow athletes coming out: “I’m guessing in five years we won’t be talking about it. I think it’s going to take a few more years for everyone to be comfortable."


Rogers was followed by now-retired NBAer Jason Collins and then-NFL prospect and now free agent Michael Sam.


Getty Images Jeff Gross




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What Do You Want Your Tombstone To Say?

You can live forever, but in case you don’t, what will your tombstone say?


It can be fun to think about how people in the distant future will remember you.


It can be fun to think about how people in the distant future will remember you.


Lionsgate


Tombstones are a little morbid, but they're also a permanent way of expressing who you are.


Tombstones are a little morbid, but they're also a permanent way of expressing who you are.


Warner Bros. Pictures / Via rihannasnose.tumblr.com


Some are funny:


Some are funny:


bassfiles.net


Others get an important message across:


Others get an important message across:


Flickr: phoebeofthesea / Via homospirituality.com




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Thursday, December 18, 2014

28 Things You Need To Know About Robbie Rogers

Fresh off of an MLS Cup win and the release of his new book Coming Out to Play, the soccer star visited BuzzFeed to talk fashion, ping-pong, and more!



Macey J. Foronda / BuzzFeed


1. Even though he wrote a long public coming-out letter and now a book, he still considers one of his greatest weaknesses to be writing. "I have no confidence in myself as a writer," he said.


2. But he considers his greatest strength to be "the personal side of business" and building relationships. "I've learned that I'm OK at that."


3. The feeling of coming out to his family "was definitely better than anything I've had in my career."


4. But winning the MLS Cup earlier this month with the Los Angeles Galaxy was a career highlight and "felt like everything [was] coming together in life," Rogers said.


5. Rogers had won the championship with the Columbus Crew prior to coming out — in the same stadium, nonetheless — but this time, he said it was totally different. "I was able to celebrate, and cry, and laugh, and be happy with my family, and know exactly who I am, what I've gone through."



Macey J. Foronda / BuzzFeed


6. Before writing Coming Out to Play, Rogers said the longest thing he's ever written was a 10-page paper his freshman year at the University of Maryland.


7. His inspiration for writing the book was the reaction to his coming-out letter and "figuring out that I'm not the only gay person in the world, and a lot of people struggle with this stuff."


8. Writing the book was "like a breakup," Rogers said. "I learned a lot about myself while I was writing it ... you learn a lot of things."


9. The response has been the best part of writing. "Never in a million years did I think I was going to save someone's life by selfishly coming out to my family," Rogers said.




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“If Harry Potter taught us anything it’s that no one should live in a closet.” She wins Twitter once again.


This week, J.K. Rowling revealed that there was at least one Jewish student at Hogwarts.


This week, J.K. Rowling revealed that there was at least one Jewish student at Hogwarts.


Ben Pruchnie / Getty Images




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21 Writers Who Got It Right About New York City

Before Jay Z, there was Jay D. (Joan Didion. Sorry.)



Creative Commons / Flickr: smcgee


"Each neighborhood of the city appeared to be made of a different substance, each seemed to have a different air pressure, a different psychic weight: the bright lights and shuttered shops, the housing projects and luxury hotels, the fire escapes and city parks."

-- Teju Cole, Open City



Getty Images / iStockphoto / stu99


"Quite simply, I was in love with New York. I do not mean "love" in any colloquial way, I mean that I was in love with the city, the way you love the first person who ever touches you and you never love anyone quite that way again."

-- Joan Didion, "Goodbye To All That"




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Problems Every Book Lover Will Understand

“Harry Potter is not a children’s book.


You know the struggle.



youtube.com


You're like:


You're like:


TriStar


Everyone else is like:


Everyone else is like:


Nickelodeon


Basically:


Basically:


Disney




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Wednesday, December 17, 2014

What We Talk About When We Talk About PostSecret

Frank Warren’s PostSecret project in a post-“Secret” world.



Jenny Chang / BuzzFeed


For more than 10 years, strangers from around the world have been sending their secrets to a suburban home in Germantown, Maryland, scribbled or pasted onto anonymous postcards. Over time, the mailbox at 13345 Copper Ridge Road has held not only secrets but wedding bands, engagement rings, and razor blades: objects taped to cards and sent away as untraceable secrets themselves.


And every Sunday, Frank Warren — the founder of PostSecret and keeper of the mailbox — has dutifully scanned and posted a handful of these postcards to his lo-fi Wordpress site, PostSecret.com. What began as a personal art project has become an international community, now entering its second decade.



Creative Commons / Via Flickr: anabananasplit


There are two secrets that Warren has seen hundred of times. The first is "I pee in the shower." The second?


"I see this secret every time I go to my mailbox. I always see it expressed a different way," Warren said in an interview with BuzzFeed. "It's basically a story about trying to find that one person who you can tell all your secrets to. There's that common thread, that search for intimacy, that search for the one person we can be our whole and true selves with."


Now, of course, there's an app for that. In fact, there are several. But the world is a markedly different place today than it was a decade ago, when Warren began the PostSecret project. It was 2004: there was no Twitter, there was no Instagram, and Facebook had just launched out of Mark Zuckerberg's dorm room. The iPhone didn't exist. Edward Snowden was 21.


Today's top secret-sharing apps — Whisper, Secret, and Yik Yak — are rumored to be valued at a combined total of well over $400 million. But before the economy of secrets boomed to its current size, there was Frank Warren: a man with a mailbox in Germantown, Maryland. In 2004, Warren started an art project called PostSecret, calling for strangers to send him postcards with their anonymous secrets. He hoped to receive 365. To date, he has received more than a million from around the world.




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